mentaltimetraveller:

Vito Acconci, Adjustable Wall Bra, 1990-91

mentaltimetraveller:

Vito Acconci, Adjustable Wall Bra, 1990-91

(via bobasprite)

— 3 hours ago with 34 notes
Nintendo launched several peripherals for the NES back in the 1980s. Most of us remember, or at least heard of, the power glove and the light gun. But then, there were the stranger attempts, like Nintendo Knitting Machine, designed to help you make those oh-so-delightful ’80s sweaters. And no, I am not making this up.

"Gamemaster" Howard Phillips, who worked for Nintendo in the decade running from 1981 to 1991, recently shared this brochure from the late 1980s on his Facebook page, confirming that the prototype, at least, did indeed exist. Phillips had to give a demonstration of it to the chairman of Toys R Us. “Likely one of my least genuinely enthusiastic demos,” Phillips added.

The full text of the handout reads:


You’re looking at the Nintendo Knitting Machine.
It’s not a game; not a toy; not something a young girl can outgrow in three or six months or even a year.
It’s a machine that interacts with the powerful Nintendo Entertainment System to actually knit sweaters: and not just one or two patterns but a multitude of different and unique designs.
The Nintendo Knitting Machine is just one more example of the innovative thinking that keeps Nintendo on the cutting edge of video technology. And your customers on the edge of their seats.
Of course we should probably mention that no other video game system offers anything even remotely similar. But why needle the competition?


I could point out that girls actually used the NES for playing video games on, that boys might have liked to knit, or that the “needle” pun in the last sentence is just terrible but given that, happily, the device never made it to consumers, that really just seems like piling on.
The Nintendo Knitting Machine has apparently not been seen or heard of since, and existed only as the most vague of rumors. And so, the world was deprived of Knitendo puns… until today.

Nintendo launched several peripherals for the NES back in the 1980s. Most of us remember, or at least heard of, the power glove and the light gun. But then, there were the stranger attempts, like Nintendo Knitting Machine, designed to help you make those oh-so-delightful ’80s sweaters. And no, I am not making this up.

"Gamemaster" Howard Phillips, who worked for Nintendo in the decade running from 1981 to 1991, recently shared this brochure from the late 1980s on his Facebook page, confirming that the prototype, at least, did indeed exist. Phillips had to give a demonstration of it to the chairman of Toys R Us. “Likely one of my least genuinely enthusiastic demos,” Phillips added.

The full text of the handout reads:

You’re looking at the Nintendo Knitting Machine.

It’s not a game; not a toy; not something a young girl can outgrow in three or six months or even a year.

It’s a machine that interacts with the powerful Nintendo Entertainment System to actually knit sweaters: and not just one or two patterns but a multitude of different and unique designs.

The Nintendo Knitting Machine is just one more example of the innovative thinking that keeps Nintendo on the cutting edge of video technology. And your customers on the edge of their seats.

Of course we should probably mention that no other video game system offers anything even remotely similar. But why needle the competition?

I could point out that girls actually used the NES for playing video games on, that boys might have liked to knit, or that the “needle” pun in the last sentence is just terrible but given that, happily, the device never made it to consumers, that really just seems like piling on.

The Nintendo Knitting Machine has apparently not been seen or heard of since, and existed only as the most vague of rumors. And so, the world was deprived of Knitendo puns… until today.

— 2 days ago with 46 notes
iseo58:

Yagua Indian girl with sloth - Amazon Peru

iseo58:

Yagua Indian girl with sloth - Amazon Peru

(via bleu-sh)

— 2 days ago with 4071 notes
#traid (at Kingsland, London)

#traid (at Kingsland, London)

— 2 days ago with 2 notes
#traid 
anotherafrica:

In Conversation with Manthe Ribane, a Soweto based Performance Artist
Manthe Ribane is a performance wunderkind. She is the muse in the NOT x Chris Saunders fashion and photography collaboration shot in Johannesburg that we’ve recently been featuring, and the last interview to close out the series.
She shares a few thoughts on her inspiration for each of the images shot by Chris Saunders. 

The NOT x Vernac character is a global story. How can you define a bag that can create so many jobs around the world, protect so many lives, but still be one with you, still keep your stories and your secrets? It’s just a bag, but it’s not just a bag.  That’s the idea behind that performance. Also it was shot in the Noord, the place that connects you to every place you need to be in Joburg.

For the Not x Floyd Avenue,  outfit that character is someone who could cover the world, like a mother. I will represent, I will fight for you. It’s crazy how an outfit can just transform you. She’s wearing a crown, but she’s still wearing a dungaree. The lips are gold, meaning she spoke gold in the city of gold. For me, the face paint is both playful and powerful. Black is very dark and powerful, aggressive. But the gold keeps it godly and mysterious.

For NOT x Dr. Pachanga  character where my face is painted gold, I really felt golden. You can come from the dingiest place, but it’s about how are you going to take yourself, as trash or as golden? Nobody knows your struggle or what you’ve left behind at home, but it’s how you are going to represent yourself out to the world that matters the most.

The last shoot, the Not x Macdee giant puppet in Orange Farm was an emotional experience for me. I could see the pain in the kids eyes, waiting for hope and faith of steps further. The outfit made people laugh and excited. That feeling made me both happy and sad at the same time. I wish I had a million rand to help them all, create sport activities, art exhibitions, job creation, reading creation centers, to create a powerful journey of hope for them. I hope that the project will make people aware that life is about making a difference, and taking a dream to a beyond extraordinary expectation.
Source | anotherafrica.net
Images courtesy of Chris Saunders. All rights reserved.
 ANOTHERAFRICA.NET |  TUMBLR |  FACEBOOK  |  TWITTER  |  INSTAGRAM

anotherafrica:

In Conversation with Manthe Ribane, a Soweto based Performance Artist

Manthe Ribane is a performance wunderkind. She is the muse in the NOT x Chris Saunders fashion and photography collaboration shot in Johannesburg that we’ve recently been featuring, and the last interview to close out the series.

She shares a few thoughts on her inspiration for each of the images shot by Chris Saunders.

The NOT x Vernac character is a global story. How can you define a bag that can create so many jobs around the world, protect so many lives, but still be one with you, still keep your stories and your secrets? It’s just a bag, but it’s not just a bag.  That’s the idea behind that performance. Also it was shot in the Noord, the place that connects you to every place you need to be in Joburg.

For the Not x Floyd Avenue,  outfit that character is someone who could cover the world, like a mother. I will represent, I will fight for you. It’s crazy how an outfit can just transform you. She’s wearing a crown, but she’s still wearing a dungaree. The lips are gold, meaning she spoke gold in the city of gold. For me, the face paint is both playful and powerful. Black is very dark and powerful, aggressive. But the gold keeps it godly and mysterious.

For NOT x Dr. Pachanga  character where my face is painted gold, I really felt golden. You can come from the dingiest place, but it’s about how are you going to take yourself, as trash or as golden? Nobody knows your struggle or what you’ve left behind at home, but it’s how you are going to represent yourself out to the world that matters the most.

The last shoot, the Not x Macdee giant puppet in Orange Farm was an emotional experience for me. I could see the pain in the kids eyes, waiting for hope and faith of steps further. The outfit made people laugh and excited. That feeling made me both happy and sad at the same time. I wish I had a million rand to help them all, create sport activities, art exhibitions, job creation, reading creation centers, to create a powerful journey of hope for them. I hope that the project will make people aware that life is about making a difference, and taking a dream to a beyond extraordinary expectation.

Source | anotherafrica.net

Images courtesy of Chris Saunders. All rights reserved.

ANOTHERAFRICA.NET | TUMBLR | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

— 3 days ago with 57 notes

Issey Miyake MOVES, 2002

(Source: mosskatetoe, via tsu-mei)

— 6 days ago with 3695 notes
Looks like the third time isn’t the charm for British retailer Primark. After a Welsh woman discovered a “cry for help” stitched into the lining of a £10 dress she purchased, two additional shoppers have stepped forward with handmade messages of their own. Rebecca Gallagher from Swansea was the first to report a label with the hand-embroidered message, “Forced to work exhausting hours,” on Wednesday. A few days later, 21-year-old Rebecca Jones, revealed a similar label—this time bearing the words “Degrading sweatshop conditions”—on a dress she purchased at the same Primark store.
A third shopper, Karen Wisínska of County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland, claimed to find a note, alleging slave labor conditions in a Chinese prison, hidden inside a pair of trousers. Wisinska told BBC News that she bought the trousers in Primark’s Belfast store in June 2011 but had never worn them. It was just last week that she discovered the missive, which was wrapped around a jail identity card.
The author of the note said inmates are forced to work 15-hour days “like oxen” making clothes. They were also fed “worse than pigs and dogs,” he said.
The veracity of the labels and note are still unclear. Primark has described the matter as “very strange,” noting that both Gallagher and Jones’s dresses went on sale a year ago, while Wisínska’s trousers were last sold in Northern Ireland in October 2009.
“Despite growing suspicions in relation to the origin of the labels and the considerable time delay since the garments were bought, Primark knows its responsibilities to the workers in its supply chain and has already started detailed investigations,” a spokesman said in a statement. “We are requesting to collect the three items from the customers and we will then be able to examine in detail the circumstances in which the additional label or information was attached.”
The retailer said it carried out more than 2,000 factory inspections in 2013 alone and employs a team of “over 45 professionals dedicated to maintaining the standards set out in its code.”

UPDATE | 30/6/14 Primark released another press release on Friday declaring that the Swansea labels are “more likely than not” to be hoaxes. 
“The labels are clearly from the same source,” a spokesman said. “It is almost impossible to imagine circumstances in which such similar labels could have been sewn onto the garments at the factory where they were made, given that they were made by different suppliers, in different factories, on different continents, one in Romania and the other in India, thousands of miles apart. However, both garments carrying the hoax labels, were bought from our Swansea store in 2013.”
“It may be no more than a coincidence that an exhibition of labels of a similar kind was held in Swansea, also in 2013,” he added. “Visitors were encouraged to sew labels, using similar wording and appearance to the hoax labels, onto clothing.”
Primark said it is still investigating the origin of the note from the North Ireland trousers, as well as any link it may have to the Swansea labels.

Looks like the third time isn’t the charm for British retailer Primark. After a Welsh woman discovered a “cry for help” stitched into the lining of a £10 dress she purchased, two additional shoppers have stepped forward with handmade messages of their own. Rebecca Gallagher from Swansea was the first to report a label with the hand-embroidered message, “Forced to work exhausting hours,” on Wednesday. A few days later, 21-year-old Rebecca Jones, revealed a similar label—this time bearing the words “Degrading sweatshop conditions”—on a dress she purchased at the same Primark store.

A third shopper, Karen Wisínska of County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland, claimed to find a note, alleging slave labor conditions in a Chinese prison, hidden inside a pair of trousers. Wisinska told BBC News that she bought the trousers in Primark’s Belfast store in June 2011 but had never worn them. It was just last week that she discovered the missive, which was wrapped around a jail identity card.

The author of the note said inmates are forced to work 15-hour days “like oxen” making clothes. They were also fed “worse than pigs and dogs,” he said.

The veracity of the labels and note are still unclear. Primark has described the matter as “very strange,” noting that both Gallagher and Jones’s dresses went on sale a year ago, while Wisínska’s trousers were last sold in Northern Ireland in October 2009.

“Despite growing suspicions in relation to the origin of the labels and the considerable time delay since the garments were bought, Primark knows its responsibilities to the workers in its supply chain and has already started detailed investigations,” a spokesman said in a statement. “We are requesting to collect the three items from the customers and we will then be able to examine in detail the circumstances in which the additional label or information was attached.”

The retailer said it carried out more than 2,000 factory inspections in 2013 alone and employs a team of “over 45 professionals dedicated to maintaining the standards set out in its code.”

UPDATE | 30/6/14 Primark released another press release on Friday declaring that the Swansea labels are “more likely than not” to be hoaxes.

“The labels are clearly from the same source,” a spokesman said. “It is almost impossible to imagine circumstances in which such similar labels could have been sewn onto the garments at the factory where they were made, given that they were made by different suppliers, in different factories, on different continents, one in Romania and the other in India, thousands of miles apart. However, both garments carrying the hoax labels, were bought from our Swansea store in 2013.”

“It may be no more than a coincidence that an exhibition of labels of a similar kind was held in Swansea, also in 2013,” he added. “Visitors were encouraged to sew labels, using similar wording and appearance to the hoax labels, onto clothing.”

Primark said it is still investigating the origin of the note from the North Ireland trousers, as well as any link it may have to the Swansea labels.

— 1 week ago with 10 notes
#hoax or not?